U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (Publish)

(U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY)

TSA extends face mask requirement through January 18, 2022

WASHINGTON – The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is extending the face mask requirement for individuals across all transportation networks throughout the United States, including at airports, onboard commercial aircraft, on over-the-road buses, and on commuter bus and rail systems through January 18, 2022.

On January 31, TSA announced the initial face mask requirement with an expiration date of May 11. On April 30, TSA announced an extension to the face mask requirement through September 13, 2021.

Airline travelers should check with their airline on additional inflight restrictions prior to taking their trip. All commuters and travelers should check with the CDC website for additional guidance. Exemptions to the face mask requirement for travelers under the age of 2 years old and those with certain disabilities as well as civil penalty fines will also remain in place.

Travelers with questions regarding airport security screening procedures may send a message via Facebook or Twitter to @AskTSA for live assistance from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET on weekdays or 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET on weekends/holidays. Individuals who require screening assistance due to a disability, medical condition or other special circumstance may contact TSA Cares at least 72 hours in advancecontact TSA Cares at least 72 hours in advance of their flight by calling (855) 787-2227 .For additional information about TSA procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic as part of our “Stay Healthy. Stay Secure.” campaign, visit​ tsa.gov/coronavirus.

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (Publish)

(U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY)

Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office:

WASHINGTON—The Department of Homeland Security’s Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office (CWMD) awarded a $6.7M task order to procure 2,364 Polimaster next-generation personal radiation detectors (PRDs) for the U.S. Coast Guard. These PRDs are specialized for use in a maritime environment to detect radiological and nuclear threats. The task order award was made under an existing blanket purchase agreement with William F. Hawk Consulting.

“As detection capabilities continue to advance, DHS must stay ahead of the curve,” said CWMD acting Assistant Secretary Gary Rasicot. “I am proud of the CWMD team for working hard to ensure that USCG personnel has the best technology available to carry out their critical mission.”

Standard PRDs are pager-size devices worn by operators to detect radiological and nuclear threats. Since the maritime environment poses a challenge for standard PRDs, CWMD worked to adjust the device’s capabilities to detect emerging threats on the seas. U.S. Coast Guard utilizes the maritime variant PRDs to monitor their unique environment, in addition to land environments, for changes in the natural radiation level. Maritime variant PRDs signal a threat is present by alarming the user if the sea environment’s radiation level exceeds the natural amount and localizes the threat.

CWMD announced the first contract award to procure maritime variant PRDs in July 2020 for 3,001 devices and associated training. This latest task order of 2,364 PRDs is anticipated to be completed in July 2022.

CWMD serves as the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s focal point for counter-WMD efforts. By supporting operational partners across federal, state, and local levels, CWMD coordinates and manages the detection effort for chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear (CBRN), and health security threats. CWMD is committed to enhancing domestic law enforcement and first responder detection, interdiction, response, and reporting of CBRN threats.

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-(Publish)

(U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY)

Office of Public Affairs:

Readout of Secretary Mayorkas’s Visit to Miami, Florida

WASHINGTON – On Thursday, August 19, 2021, Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas traveled to Miami, Florida to participate in a series of important engagements with the Cuban and Haitian diaspora communities in Miami focused on hearing from community leaders about critical issues in their countries of origin and providing updates on the latest actions from the Administration. Secretary Mayorkas was joined by Special Assistant to the President and National Security Council (NSC) Senior Director for the Western Hemisphere Juan Gonzalez and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Principal Advisor to the Administrator Mark Feierstein. The Secretary’s meetings with community leaders were the latest engagements carried out by the White House Office of Public Engagement during these critical moments – the President met with Cuban American leaders at the White House in July, and Gonzalez met with Haitian diaspora leaders following his trip to Haiti in July.



In Miami, Secretary Mayorkas met with Cuban American leaders at La Ermita de la Caridad to reiterate the Biden-Harris Administration’s continued support for the Cuban people – including last month’s historic demonstrations in Cuba and the Administration’s response, which have included placing sanctions and working to get internet to the island.



Secretary Mayorkas and Representative Frederica Wilson also engaged with Haitian American community leaders at Notre Dame D’Haiti to express the Biden-Harris Administration’s steadfast commitment to and diligent work in ensuring the safety and well-being of Haitians as the country recovers from back-to-back severe political and natural disaster crises.



While in South Florida, Secretary Mayorkas, Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz, and Miami-Dade Mayor Daniella Levine Cava visited the site of the tragic Surfside condo building collapse to pay their respects to the nearly 100 victims lost in the June disaster. Secretary Mayorkas also visited the Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Department to personally thank the first responders for their efforts.



At Miami International Airport, Secretary Mayorkas thanked the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officers and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers for their dedicated efforts as frontline workers today and every day to keep the traveling American public safe.



Also while in Miami, NSC Senior Director Gonzalez, USAID Principal Advisor Feierstein, and Florida State Senator Annette Taddeo met with Colombian and Venezuelan community leaders. Administration officials provided updates on how the Administration is navigating global challenges and they heard from community leaders about their concerns.

Secretary Mayorkas visits Miami, Florida (Official DHS Photo by Benjamin Applebaum/Released)
Secretary Mayorkas visits Miami, Florida (Official DHS Photo by Benjamin Applebaum/Released)

Secretary Mayorkas visits Miami, Florida (Official DHS Photo by Benjamin Applebaum/Released)

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مشترك بشأن وضع النساء والفتيات في أفغانستانبيان مشترك بشأن وضع النساء والفتيات في أفغانستان

وزارة الخارجية الأمريكية
مكتب المتحدث باسم وزارة الخارجية
بيان صحفي
18 آب/أغسطس 2021

شاركت كل من ألبانيا والأرجنتين وأستراليا والبرازيل وكندا وتشيلي وكولومبيا وكوستاريكا والإكوادور والسلفادور والاتحاد الأوروبي وهندوراس وغواتيمالا ومقدونيا الشمالية ونيوزيلندا والنرويج وباراغواي والسنغال وسويسرا والمملكة المتحدة والولايات المتحدة الأمريكية في التوقيع على البيان التالي:

بداية النص:

نشعر بقلق بالغ بشأن النساء والفتيات الأفغانيات وحقهن في التعليم والعمل وحرية الحركة. وندعو من هم في مواقع السلطة في مختلف أنحاء أفغانستان إلى ضمان حمايتهن.
تستحق النساء والفتيات الأفغانيات العيش في أمن وأمان وكرامة، شأنهن شأن الشعب الأفغاني كله، وينبغي تجنب أي شكل من أشكال التمييز والانتهاكات. إن المجتمع الدولي جاهز لمدهن بالمساعدات الإنسانية والدعم لضمان منحهن القدرة على إسماع أصواتهن.

سنتابع عن كثب كيف تنوي أي حكومة مستقبلية ضمان الحقوق والحريات التي باتت جزءا لا يتجزأ من حياة النساء والفتيات في أفغانستان على مدار السنوات العشرين الأخيرة.

للاطلاع على النص الأصلي:

 https://www.state.gov/joint-statement-on-the-situation-of-women-and-girls-in-afghanistan/

هذه الترجمة هي خدمة مجانية، مع الأخذ بالاعتبار أن النص الانجليزي الأصلي هو النص الرسمي.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Release

(U.S. Department of Homeland Security)

Readout of Secretary Mayorkas’s Call with Counterparts from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom – Office of Public Affairs

WASHINGTON – On August 17, 2021, Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas participated in a call with Five Eyes counterparts from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom to discuss the ongoing situation in Afghanistan. Secretary Mayorkas and the Ministers discussed efforts to facilitate the relocation of our citizens and their families, Afghan nationals who have worked for and on behalf of the United States and our allies, and other eligible vulnerable Afghans. The group discussed the necessity of providing safe passage in Kabul for vulnerable individuals and committed to coordinating further on relocation and resettlement efforts.
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U.S. Department of Homeland Security & United States Department of Justice Joint release

Proposed Rulemaking to Make Asylum Process More Efficient and Ensure Fairness – Office of Public Affairs

WASHINGTON – In a key step toward implementing the Administration’s blueprint for a fair, orderly, and humane immigration system, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Department of Justice (DOJ) are publishing a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) that would amend current regulations to improve the processing of asylum claims. The proposed rule would allow, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) asylum officers to hear and decide applications for asylum, withholding of removal, and Convention Against Torture (CAT) protection for individuals who receive a positive credible fear determination. These cases are currently assigned to immigration judges within DOJ’s Executive Office for Immigration Review.

“These proposed changes will significantly improve DHS’s and DOJ’s ability to more promptly and efficiently consider the asylum claims of individuals encountered at or near the border, while ensuring fundamental fairness,” said Secretary Alejandro N. Mayorkas. “Individuals who are eligible will receive relief more swiftly, while those who are not eligible will be expeditiously removed. We are building an immigration system that is designed to ensure due process, respect human dignity, and promote equity.”

“Today marks a step forward in our effort to make the asylum process fairer and more expeditious,” said Attorney General Merrick Garland. “This rule will both reduce the caseload in our immigration courts and protect the rights of those fleeing persecution and violence.”

The current system for hearing and adjudicating asylum claims at the southwest border has long needed repair. For nearly a decade, the number of such claims has ballooned, and the system has proved unable to keep pace, resulting in large backlogs and years-long delays in adjudication. The proposed rule aims to begin replacing the current system with a better and more efficient one to adjudicate protection claims fairly and expeditiously.

Under the proposed process, an individual who establishes a credible fear of removal will be referred to a USCIS asylum officer for a hearing on the protection claims. The asylum officer will be authorized to adjudicate in the first instance requests for asylum, as well as eligibility for statutory withholding of removal or for withholding or deferral of removal under the Convention Against Torture. In a denied case, the individual may request de novo administrative review by an immigration judge under a streamlined process, with further administrative appeal available through the Board of Immigration Appeals.

The rule also proposes a revision to the criteria applicable to grants of parole prior to the credible fear determination. The proposal would allow DHS to grant parole when “detention is unavailable or impracticable,” in addition to the existing criteria involving medical emergencies and law enforcement objectives.

The rule would apply to individuals who are placed into the expedited removal process on or after the effective date of the final rule. The rule would not apply to unaccompanied children or to individuals already residing in the United States. Details for submitting public comments can be found in the soon-to-be published NPRM.

This proposed rule joins a number of actions the Biden-Harris Administration is taking to build a fair, orderly, and humane immigration system, including by expanding pathways to apply for protection and opportunity in home countries, addressing the root causes of migration, and securely managing the Southwest border.

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U.S. Department of Homeland Security Release

(U.S. Department of Homeland Security)

Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office

WASHINGTON—The Department of Homeland Security’s Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office (CWMD) awarded a $19.9M task order to Thermo Eberline LLC under an existing Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity contract. The task order funds the procurement of RadEye spectroscopic personal radiation detectors for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). The funding also provides CBP and TSA with associated training for the devices.

“Protecting our Nation from radiological and nuclear threats requires a whole-of-government effort,” says CWMD Acting Assistant Secretary Gary Rasicot. “As the Department’s lead for counter-WMD efforts, this award will enable CWMD to fulfill our responsibility to coordinate with our partners across the Department to ensure they have the technologies they need to detect new and evolving threats.”

Personal radiation detectors are pager-size devices worn by operators to provide personal protection and a detection capability against radiological and nuclear threats. These devices continuously monitor the environment to alert the user of a threat when the natural gamma and neutron radiation levels are above normal. They also help locate the source of the detected threat.

CWMD previously awarded a total of $26.1M between 2018 and 2019 to procure RadEye spectroscopic personal radiation detectors for CBP. This new order allows CBP to field the remainder of the detectors ahead of schedule.

CWMD serves as the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s focal point for counter-WMD efforts. By supporting operational partners across federal, state, and local levels, CWMD coordinates and manages the detection effort for chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear (CBRN), and health security threats. CWMD is committed to enhancing domestic law enforcement and first responder detection, interdiction, response, and reporting of CBRN threats.

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Issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture

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FOR INFORMATION AND ACTION
DA-2021-23
August 17, 2021



Subject: APHIS updates the Citrus Black Spot (Phyllosticta citricarpa) Quarantine Area in Florida

To: State and Territory Agricultural Regulatory Officials

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding 37 sections in Charlotte County, 17 sections in Collier County, 45 sections in Glades County, 68 sections in Hendry County, and 28 sections in Lee County, to the citrus black spot (CBS) quarantine area in Florida. We are taking this action because of confirmed detections of P. citricarpa (formerly known as Guignardia citricarpa), the causal agent of CBS, during annual surveys conducted during the 2019 and 2020 growing seasons by APHIS, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division of Plant Industry (DPI). APHIS is applying safeguarding measures and restrictions on the interstate movement, or entry into foreign trade, of regulated articles from these areas. Federal Order DA-2012-09 outlines these measures and restrictions and parallels DPI’s state-interior quarantine and intrastate movement requirements.

In 2010, CBS was first identified in the Collier and Hendry Counties of Florida. Symptoms of CBS are most evident on mature fruit, with little to no symptoms on leaves. Fresh citrus fruit moved interstate from the CBS quarantine areas must be processed using APHIS-approved methods and packed in commercial citrus packinghouses operating under a compliance agreement with APHIS. APHIS prohibits the movement of any other citrus plant parts outside the quarantine area.

As established in Federal Order DA-2012-09, APHIS will publish a description of this CBS quarantine area expansion on the website listed below. This website contains a description of all the current CBS quarantine areas,

Federal Orders, and APHIS-approved packinghouse procedures:



​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ https://www.aphis.usda.gov/planthealth/blackspot





For additional information regarding the CBS program, you may contact Shailaja Rabindran, Director of Specialty Crops and Cotton Pests, (301) 851-2167.





/s/

Dr. Osama El-Lissy
Deputy Administrator
Plant Protection and Quarantine