International Women’s Day, Chamber Choir, Harpsicord Music, & More

International Women’s Day, Chamber Choir, Harpsicord Music, & More

Watch these videos just added to the Library of Congress website.

Conversation with Tido Visser, Netherlands Chamber Choir

Join us for a conversation with the Netherlands Chamber Choir. The choir is known not only for impeccable performances of traditional repertoire but for pathbreaking projects that expand the boundaries of choral literature.Netherlands Chamber Choir, Program II

Orlando di Lasso’s “Lagrime di San Pietro” (Tears of St. Peter) stands at the summit of Renaissance polyphonic composition. A monument of the choral literature, this somber tapestry of 20 madrigals and a concluding motet tells the story of the betrayal of Jesus Christ by Saint Peter. The Netherlands Chamber Choir’s vision of the work creates a riveting central focus for a dancer in the role of the saint. 

I Am Not Invisible 3.0

Marking International Women’s Day, the Library of Congress Veterans History Project and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Center for Women Veterans sponsored this virtual panel, which explored the challenges women veterans face, the communities they represent and how we can all be better advocates.

Conversation with Justin Taylor, Harpsichordist

French-American harpsichordist Justin Taylor talks about his recital titled “Fandango”, a program of sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti and Antonio Soler. Taylor discusses aspects of the vibrant, cosmopolitan European musical culture that influenced both composers, including the world of Italian opera coloring Scarlatti’s dramatic, operatic writing for the keyboard. 

Justin Taylor, Harpsichord

An impressive concert from the gifted young French-American harpsichordist Justin Taylor pairs sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti and his admirer and disciple Antonio Soler. His technical command and thoughtful perceptions of form and structure highlight intriguing hints of modernism from both composers. 

Pillars of Democracy: The Military

Join the John W. Kluge Center, the American Enterprise Institute, and the Brookings Institution for a conversation exploring how America sees its military today.

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