The Latest DHS OIG report is available on our website.Office of Public AffairsE: dhs-oig.officepublicaffairs@oig.dhs.gov OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL l DHSWWW.OIG.DHS.GOV l TWITTER: @DHSOIG DHS Did Not Effectively Oversee TSA’s Acquisition of Computed Tomography SystemsTSA acquired CT systems that did not address all needed capabilities. According to TSA’s 2018 Operational Requirements Document, to achieve its mission successfully, its CT systems must be able to meet throughput, detection, availability, and safety requirements. However, we determined TSA deployed 300 CT systems to airport passenger screening checkpoints that did not meet throughput requirements and, although CT systems provided enhanced detection, they required an upgrade almost immediately after purchase to address operational needs.These issues occurred because the Department of Homeland Security did not provide adequate oversight of TSA’s acquisition of CT systems. DHS is responsible for overseeing all major acquisitions to ensure they are properly planned and executed and meet documented key performance thresholds. However, DHS allowed TSA to use an acquisition approach not recognized by DHS’ acquisition guidance. In addition, DHS allowed TSA to deploy CT systems even though they did not meet all TSA key performance parameters. DHS also did not assess TSA’s detection upgrade before TSA incorporated it into the CT system. As a result, TSA risks spending over $700 million in future appropriated funding to purchase CT systems that may never fully meet operational mission needs.Read Report No. OIG-21-69

The Latest DHS OIG report is available on our website.


Office of Public Affairs
E: dhs-oig.officepublicaffairs@oig.dhs.gov
​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​
OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL l DHS
WWW.OIG.DHS.GOV ​ l TWITTER: @DHSOIG​​​​​​​​

DHS Did Not Effectively Oversee TSA’s Acquisition of Computed Tomography Systems

TSA acquired CT systems that did not address all needed capabilities. According to TSA’s 2018 Operational Requirements Document, to achieve its mission successfully, its CT systems must be able to meet throughput, detection, availability, and safety requirements. However, we determined TSA deployed 300 CT systems to airport passenger screening checkpoints that did not meet throughput requirements and, although CT systems provided enhanced detection, they required an upgrade almost immediately after purchase to address operational needs.


These issues occurred because the Department of Homeland Security did not provide adequate oversight of TSA’s acquisition of CT systems. DHS is responsible for overseeing all major acquisitions to ensure they are properly planned and executed and meet documented key performance thresholds. However, DHS allowed TSA to use an acquisition approach not recognized by DHS’ acquisition guidance. In addition, DHS allowed TSA to deploy CT systems even though they did not meet all TSA key performance parameters. DHS also did not assess TSA’s detection upgrade before TSA incorporated it into the CT system. As a result, TSA risks spending over $700 million in future appropriated funding to purchase CT systems that may never fully meet operational mission needs.

Read Report No. OIG-21-69

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